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I have a new 2021 Limited with Black interior and it smells. I have called all 3 dealerships in my area and they all said "It's the first I have heard of this". Ugh. I opened case with Hyundai and they never have heard about this either. They setup me up with an appointment and I'm sure it will be a waste of time.
 

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I have a new 2021 Limited with Black interior and it smells. I have called all 3 dealerships in my area and they all said "It's the first I have heard of this". Ugh. I opened case with Hyundai and they never have heard about this either. They setup me up with an appointment and I'm sure it will be a waste of time.
I was told same thing, just have not made appointment yet.
 

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I purchased my Palisade Limited Trim with black interior in August 2020. Instead of having a new car smell, the interior has an unpleasant odor, the source of which I am unable to determine. I have checked for leaks, mold, etc. to no avail. I had initially attributed the odor to the fact that the car had only recently arrived in country and had been wrapped in protective covering during transport. However, it has now been months and the odor persists. Due to the weather and driving conditions since purchasing the Palisade, I have not had opportunities to give it a good airing out. Is anyone else experienced this unpleasant odor issue?
You are certainly not alone. Our loaded 2020 Palisade Limited HTRAC with the light beige interior has the same sour smell to the leather. Has had since new, 1 year and 14,000 miles ago. The dealer professes not to be able to confirm that there is any issue. Very frustrating. Obviously Hyundai are aware of this issue with first run models and is trying to sweep the issue under the rug. And the Dealers are complicit. Don't tell me that I am the first and only customer to ever have this issue. Oh! , they did suggest that it might be the "work out gear" in the back seat. It was in fact my wife's sweater that was in the back seat.......Really? We are meticulous with keeping our vehicles clean inside and out. How transparent and pathetic.
 

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Has anyone tried contacting a Class Action attorney? It sure seems like there have been enough owners with the bad smell issue.
 

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Here's a new one ! Was just told over phone by Hyundai there is a fix for this issue. My local dealer will be contacting me to set appointment by Tuesday 09/15/2020. I will post results as soon as I find out if it's possible to fix.
 

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Here's a new one ! Was just told over phone by Hyundai there is a fix for this issue. My local dealer will be contacting me to set appointment by Tuesday 09/15/2020. I will post results as soon as I find out if it's possible to fix.
Thanks for the update! Looking forward to the proposed resolution!
 

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If your car smells take head rest off first 2 rows and place them in a plastic garbage bag. Keep them warm. See how that bag smells in about 8 hours. Enjoy the smell.
 

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@pso
first post and you're claiming ARSENIC

care to provide proof? If you can't then you're nothing but a troll and should be banned. Don't go screaming FIRE in a packed movie theater without any proof please.
 

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@pso
first post and you're claiming ARSENIC

care to provide proof? If you can't then you're nothing but a troll and should be banned. Don't go screaming FIRE in a packed movie theater without any proof please.
@pso and @raggedy1 - Very interesting. South Korean flag as well. Would be interesting to know if his/her IP address is also homed in South Korea. So many questions.

A few facts to consider:

1) Unfortunately, leather production involves several heavy metals and finishing chemicals (like arsenic) that are in fact known carcinogens.

2) When heated in air, arsenic oxidizes to arsenic trioxide; the fumes from this reaction have an odor resembling garlic.

3) Currently some Palisades, when left in the hot sun, begin emitting something that resembles garlic from their leather seats.

4) Most of these chemical processes are illegal in the US, but are still widely used in South America, China, Pakistan and India. Might want to find out where the Palisade leathers are sourced from.

I don’t know folks, but I would NOT drive one of these vehicles, especially with small children, if you have a garlic smell associated with your leather seats.

God I hope I’m wrong and that there’s a perfectly logical explanation for this. But where there’s smoke....or in this case garlic....there may also be arsenic.

See below as a source document:

Boiling and sun drying can oxidize and convert the various chromium(III) compounds used in tanning into carcinogenic hexavalent chromium, or chromium(VI). This hexavalent chromium runoff and scraps are then consumed by animals, in the case of Bangladesh, chickens (the nation's most common source of protein). Up to 25% of the chickens in Bangladesh contained harmful levels of hexavalent chromium, adding to the national health problem load.[20]

Chromium is not solely responsible for these diseases. Methylisothiazolinone, which is used for microbiological protection (fungal or bacterial growth), causes problems with the eyes and skin. Anthracene, which is used as a leather tanning agent, can cause problems in the kidneys and liver and is also considered a carcinogen. Formaldehyde and arsenic, which are used for leather finishing, cause health problems in the eyes, lungs, liver, kidneys, skin, and lymphatic system and are also considered carcinogens.[18] The waste from leather tanneries is detrimental to the environment and the people who live in it. The use of old technologies plays a large factor in how hazardous wastewater results in contaminating the environment. This is especially prominent in small and medium-sized tanneries in developing countries.[21]
 

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@pso and @raggedy1 - Very interesting. South Korean flag as well. Would be interesting to know if his/her IP address is also homed in South Korea. So many questions.

A few facts to consider:

1) Unfortunately, leather production involves several heavy metals and finishing chemicals (like arsenic) that are in fact known carcinogens.

2) When heated in air, arsenic oxidizes to arsenic trioxide; the fumes from this reaction have an odor resembling garlic.

3) Currently some Palisades, when left in the hot sun, begin emitting something that resembles garlic from their leather seats.

4) Most of these chemical processes are illegal in the US, but are still widely used in South America, China, Pakistan and India. Might want to find out where the Palisade leathers are sourced from.

I don’t know folks, but I would NOT drive one of these vehicles, especially with small children, if you have a garlic smell associated with your leather seats.

God I hope I’m wrong and that there’s a perfectly logical explanation for this. But where there’s smoke....or in this case garlic....there may also be arsenic.

See below as a source document:

Boiling and sun drying can oxidize and convert the various chromium(III) compounds used in tanning into carcinogenic hexavalent chromium, or chromium(VI). This hexavalent chromium runoff and scraps are then consumed by animals, in the case of Bangladesh, chickens (the nation's most common source of protein). Up to 25% of the chickens in Bangladesh contained harmful levels of hexavalent chromium, adding to the national health problem load.[20]

Chromium is not solely responsible for these diseases. Methylisothiazolinone, which is used for microbiological protection (fungal or bacterial growth), causes problems with the eyes and skin. Anthracene, which is used as a leather tanning agent, can cause problems in the kidneys and liver and is also considered a carcinogen. Formaldehyde and arsenic, which are used for leather finishing, cause health problems in the eyes, lungs, liver, kidneys, skin, and lymphatic system and are also considered carcinogens.[18] The waste from leather tanneries is detrimental to the environment and the people who live in it. The use of old technologies plays a large factor in how hazardous wastewater results in contaminating the environment. This is especially prominent in small and medium-sized tanneries in developing countries.[21]
Except that the head rests are not made of leather, as has been reported multiple times in this thread.

@raggedy1 is correct. Unless you have proof, don't post this kind of dangerous conspiracy theories. We get enough of those as it is these days...
 

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I admit I dont have any proof sorry.
Just I collect informations in this web site and I thought it. And I am not professor and I dont have any knowledge about leather.. I was careless.
Actually I am not sure why it has smell. So I deleted it.

I just want to talk.
I heard Hyundai is going to take action.
If someone have this problem. Talk to them and have cure in car. That is all. Sorry..
 

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I worked at Hyundai Motor Company.
I made an export palisade to the United States. between January and June
I'm in charge of putting in the second row seats.
I would did often Two-row seat headrests bumped with 2th row seat-inserting machine tongs.
Because the seat-inputer didn't rise enough and I was careless.
I think the coating on the head rest coating was peeled off at this time.
So I strongly suspect that the headrest smells.
I made mistakes. I'm really sorry.

So ask Hyundai for a 2th head rest change.
The first rows are completely automated, so there is no defect.

***Also, I recommend you to remove the Palisade 2nd row head rest right away.
The smell is expected to disappear soon.
But Of course it's just my guess. But I think it's very likely.
 

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No affiliation

A google search on odor analysis brought up this site:


Maybe someone can contact them and discuss analyzing a headrest.
 

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@pso and @raggedy1 - Very interesting. South Korean flag as well. Would be interesting to know if his/her IP address is also homed in South Korea. So many questions.

A few facts to consider:

1) Unfortunately, leather production involves several heavy metals and finishing chemicals (like arsenic) that are in fact known carcinogens.

2) When heated in air, arsenic oxidizes to arsenic trioxide; the fumes from this reaction have an odor resembling garlic.

3) Currently some Palisades, when left in the hot sun, begin emitting something that resembles garlic from their leather seats.

4) Most of these chemical processes are illegal in the US, but are still widely used in South America, China, Pakistan and India. Might want to find out where the Palisade leathers are sourced from.

I don’t know folks, but I would NOT drive one of these vehicles, especially with small children, if you have a garlic smell associated with your leather seats.

God I hope I’m wrong and that there’s a perfectly logical explanation for this. But where there’s smoke....or in this case garlic....there may also be arsenic.

See below as a source document:

Boiling and sun drying can oxidize and convert the various chromium(III) compounds used in tanning into carcinogenic hexavalent chromium, or chromium(VI). This hexavalent chromium runoff and scraps are then consumed by animals, in the case of Bangladesh, chickens (the nation's most common source of protein). Up to 25% of the chickens in Bangladesh contained harmful levels of hexavalent chromium, adding to the national health problem load.[20]

Chromium is not solely responsible for these diseases. Methylisothiazolinone, which is used for microbiological protection (fungal or bacterial growth), causes problems with the eyes and skin. Anthracene, which is used as a leather tanning agent, can cause problems in the kidneys and liver and is also considered a carcinogen. Formaldehyde and arsenic, which are used for leather finishing, cause health problems in the eyes, lungs, liver, kidneys, skin, and lymphatic system and are also considered carcinogens.[18] The waste from leather tanneries is detrimental to the environment and the people who live in it. The use of old technologies plays a large factor in how hazardous wastewater results in contaminating the environment. This is especially prominent in small and medium-sized tanneries in developing countries.[21]
I had stated this as well several weeks ago. Arsenic is my suspicion as well. I’m an Industrial Hygiene Safety Engineer and when I hear people say garlic or sweaty sock smell, arsenic is usually looked at as the culprit.
 

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I had stated this as well several weeks ago. Arsenic is my suspicion as well. I’m an Industrial Hygiene Safety Engineer and when I hear people say garlic or sweaty sock smell, arsenic is usually looked at as the culprit.
How can owners test the smell?
 

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How can owners test the smell?
Ideally, a small sample of the leather would need to be tested for arsenic by a laboratory. They do make home test kits, but typically these are designed for checking water and food sources. It may be possible to wipe the leather with a damp cloth, soak the cloth in water, and use an arsenic test for water. The results may not be very accurate, but if any is detected, it points to a possible cause. The United Staes has strict limits on arsenic used to tan leather. Depending where the leather in the Palisades was tanned (China?), arsenic levels may be off the charts.

 
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