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Discussion Starter #1
The tires on the Palisade Limited AWD have a max air pressure rating of 51 psi. Yet the Hyundai has the tire pressure set to 35 psi. This pressure seems to be an industry standard. At this point I have increased the tire pressure to 45 psi to see if this will increase the Hwy MPG. Accountlng for temperature changes during driving that will increase the tire pressure I still have a cushion for safety. I have done this on every tire on every car I have ever owned.

Has anyone else done this and what has been the impact on their driving experience?
 

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Yeah there's a chance it'll increase your mpg, but I don't think that's a great idea.

The max tire pressure rating is not there to give an idea of how much you should inflate your tires.
There's a reason Hyundai has set the door jam psi ratings. I would recommend those, otherwise you're risking your tires wearing out prematurely or unevenly, losing traction unexpectedly, tires blowing out, etc. I would argue all of those scenarios are more costly than a few mpg.

Set it to the door jam pressure when tires are cold and leave it. IMO it's not worth the risk. Glad you've been lucky so far though.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I hear what you have said but I disagree with it because I have nearly 50 years of practice doing this and I have never had a tire problem. I have however reaped the benefits of inflating the tires as I have said. The hazard mentioned on the tire itself in very small print states that UNDER inflation will cause premature tire wear and lead to possible accidents.
 

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Over inflation is just as bad as under inflation. Premature tire wear will occur in both conditions. Here's some online info:
At Kal Tire, we hear from a lot of drivers who ask if they should be inflating their tires according to the maximum PSI (pounds per square inch) listed on the sidewall. However, when it comes to the right tire pressure, the maximum is not the optimum.
For smooth, safe rides and long-lasting tires, it’s important to find the right tire pressure for your vehicle.
The Maximum

Somewhere on the sidewall of your tire, just below the big, bold letters of the manufacturer, for example, you might have noticed the words ‘Max. Press. 35 PSI.’ That number tells you the maximum cold pressure needed for your tire to carry its maximum load.
We mention ‘cold’ pressure because that means you’re filling up your tires at the ideal time—when they’re cold. First thing in the morning or after sitting for a few hours in the shade is best.
Usually, your tire’s maximum tire pressure is somewhere between 30 and 32 PSI.
What happens if you inflate your tires to the max PSI?

  • The handling characteristics change
    Since tires inflated to the max can’t give as much on the sidewall, you might see superior cornering, but it could be at the risk of your braking threshold. One quick corner and your back end could slide out.
  • The life of your tire decreases. When your tires are inflated too much, the rubber rounds out at the top of the tire when you’re driving, and the center will quickly wear out. You’ll also reduce your traction and you could even cause a blowout. Check out our post on avoiding blowouts.
So, what’s the right tire pressure for your vehicle?
The Optimum

You’ll find the manufacturer’s optimum or recommended tire pressure for your car on a sticker in the door jam, or in your owner’s manual. Some models even place the stickers on the trunk lid, in the console or on the fuel door.
Recommended pressure is usually between 30 and 35 PSI. That number indicates the minimum amount of air pressure needed to support your vehicle’s maximum load-carrying capacity. Any less, and you’ll see poor fuel economy and handling as well as premature wear from too much flexing and tire overloading.
When your tires are inflated to the recommended PSI, you enjoy their optimum life and performance.
Inflating your tires

When’s the best time to check your tire pressure? A few good rules of thumb are: every time you fill up for gas, every 10 degree change in temperature, or every 30 days.
If you want to make sure your tires are inflated to the right pressure before you head out for a drive, stop by your nearest Kal Tire location. Just pull up and we’ll check your tire pressure and top up your tires if needed for free. Plus, we can even retorque your wheels while we’re at it so you know you’ll have a smooth ride.
 

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Over inflation is just as bad as under inflation. Premature tire wear will occur in both conditions. Here's some online info:
At Kal Tire, we hear from a lot of drivers who ask if they should be inflating their tires according to the maximum PSI (pounds per square inch) listed on the sidewall. However, when it comes to the right tire pressure, the maximum is not the optimum.

For smooth, safe rides and long-lasting tires, it’s important to find the right tire pressure for your vehicle.


The Maximum


Somewhere on the sidewall of your tire, just below the big, bold letters of the manufacturer, for example, you might have noticed the words ‘Max. Press. 35 PSI.’ That number tells you the maximum cold pressure needed for your tire to carry its maximum load.

We mention ‘cold’ pressure because that means you’re filling up your tires at the ideal time—when they’re cold. First thing in the morning or after sitting for a few hours in the shade is best.

Usually, your tire’s maximum tire pressure is somewhere between 30 and 32 PSI.


What happens if you inflate your tires to the max PSI?


  • The handling characteristics change
    Since tires inflated to the max can’t give as much on the sidewall, you might see superior cornering, but it could be at the risk of your braking threshold. One quick corner and your back end could slide out.
  • The life of your tire decreases. When your tires are inflated too much, the rubber rounds out at the top of the tire when you’re driving, and the center will quickly wear out. You’ll also reduce your traction and you could even cause a blowout. Check out our post on avoiding blowouts.

So, what’s the right tire pressure for your vehicle?

The Optimum


You’ll find the manufacturer’s optimum or recommended tire pressure for your car on a sticker in the door jam, or in your owner’s manual. Some models even place the stickers on the trunk lid, in the console or on the fuel door.

Recommended pressure is usually between 30 and 35 PSI. That number indicates the minimum amount of air pressure needed to support your vehicle’s maximum load-carrying capacity. Any less, and you’ll see poor fuel economy and handling as well as premature wear from too much flexing and tire overloading.

When your tires are inflated to the recommended PSI, you enjoy their optimum life and performance.


Inflating your tires


When’s the best time to check your tire pressure? A few good rules of thumb are: every time you fill up for gas, every 10 degree change in temperature, or every 30 days.

If you want to make sure your tires are inflated to the right pressure before you head out for a drive, stop by your nearest Kal Tire location. Just pull up and we’ll check your tire pressure and top up your tires if needed for free. Plus, we can even retorque your wheels while we’re at it so you know you’ll have a smooth ride.
Thanks for explaining this in more detail. Tire pressure is very important for safety!

Has anyone else noticed what tire pressure comes up to while driving (warm)? Mine come up to about 39 or 40psi after driving for a bit (gauge cluster shows). Would be interesting to see the difference between cold/warm. I believe mine are set to the manufacturer recommended 35psi cold.
 

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This is a normal thing to happen with tires. The pressure will increase when you start driving. That's why you should only check tire pressure before you start driving.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Especially important to remember is when the temperature starts to drop outside so does your tire's inflation. A fair rate of deflation is for every 5 degrees of temp drop you lose 1 psi. Under inflated tires can present a significant danger as well.
 

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on my Factory Limited the TPMS gauge shows mine come up to 38-41 as well in my gauge after driving 80-100 degree weather. at 73 my gauge was 38. I haven't seen the numbers below 38psi on any tire even when first starting to drive.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The tire pressure was set by the dealership at some random temp. That is the base pressure. So if the temp outside was 73 degrees then 38 psi is the base. When the autumn weather gets here you will see the air pressure in your tires decrease and the temp outside drops, although as you drive the Palisade the tire pressure will increase slightly even in colder weather due to road friction heating the tire. All of this to simply say that low tire pressure is a hazard that some people don't understand.
 

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So it’s better to be high by 5-10 than below 35. If the gauge starts showing lower than 35 I should stop and add air to tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Small variance in either direction are not the problem. Large variances are. So when the temp outside starts to drop progressively and stays cooler it is very important to check and maintain tire pressure at 35 psi or above before driving the car in the morning. Under inflated tires are a greater hazard than a moderately over inflated tire. Therefore on the sidewall of the tire there is no "minimum cold pressure" but only a "maximum cold pressure" rating which for the Palisade with 20" rims is 51 psi.

Hyundai determined that a minimum pressure of 35 psi in the tire before driving is the safest. Under inflation of a few lbs for example 32 psi because you do not have air available in the morning will not cause a problem. Just find air when you can. However leaving your tire at 32 psi and with the temp dropping into fall and winter will cause the tire air pressure to continue to drop and this will create an unsafe situation. With your tire starting at 32 psi on any given morning, after you drive for a few mlles the air in the tire will heat up and the tire pressure will increase 2 to 3 lbs as indicated on the onboard tire pressure monitoring system. This is normal. That does not mean you should not check the tires in the morning as the outside temp drops.
Ideally you want to start driving with the tires inflated to 35 psi through out the colder seasons.
 

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The tires on the Palisade Limited AWD have a max air pressure rating of 51 psi. Yet the Hyundai has the tire pressure set to 35 psi. This pressure seems to be an industry standard. At this point I have increased the tire pressure to 45 psi to see if this will increase the Hwy MPG. Accountlng for temperature changes during driving that will increase the tire pressure I still have a cushion for safety. I have done this on every tire on every car I have ever owned.

Has anyone else done this and what has been the impact on their driving experience?
45 is too high, it will cause unusual wear and cause you to spend lots on tires. Keep cold pressure to 36, highway speed will increase pressure due to heating to over 41psi. At 45psi cold you are approaching max pressure at highway speeds. That's dangerous.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have been driving cars and inflating tires for over 45 years, I believe that qualifies me to know what has worked for me. This forum is about sharing experiences as well as information. Google" Firestone and Ford Explorer" to find out what happens when your tires are under inflated. That is a greater and more immediate danger.
 

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I have been driving cars and inflating tires for over 45 years, I believe that qualifies me to know what has worked for me. This forum is about sharing experiences as well as information. Google" Firestone and Ford Explorer" to find out what happens when your tires are under inflated. That is a greater and more immediate danger.
They're both dangerous. You decrease the size of the area that is in contact with the road when you over-inflate AND when you under-inflate. You might be OK in general, but in low-traction situations, you're giving yourself less traction than if your tires were correctly inflated since the surface in contact with the road is smaller than it should be.

You also wear tires out unevenly (the outside of the tire wears out faster when under-inflated and the center of the tire wears out faster when over-inflated).

223
 

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Recall, or look-up, Charles’ and Boyles’ Laws regarding interrelationship of temperature and pressure.
Operating any tire outside of its design pressure compromises tire integrity. That “design” temperature is predicated on vehicle weight, suspension activity, tire design and build materials and provides a specific number for that tire’s application. It is the rapid flexing of the sidewalls which primarily raise tire temperatures when under load and at speed, while increasing ambient and pavement temperature will contribute to increased internal tire pressures. Simply bending a coat hangar rapidly back and forth will demonstrate temperature rise from flexion. It will also demonstrate failure from heat and loss of integrity.
Never remove air from a hot tire (nor drench with cold water to cool). Allow it to cool naturally. Then check and adjust to proper pressure.
To nearly eliminate pressure fluctuation caused by rising and falling ambient temps, you could replace air with nitrogen as race tires and commercial and military aircraft tires are maintained because of the large temperature excursions they routinely experience in operation. Many new cars are sold with nitrogen in the tires. But just adding nitrogen doesn’t get the job done. A process and special equipment is required to totally replace air with nitrogen to get the benefits of nitrogen.
 

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I just bought a Palisade SEL on 245/60/R18 Bridgestone Dueler HP Sport AS tires. Door Jam indicated Cold pressure 35. Dealer had the pressure way high between 41-43 depending on the tire. Dropped them to 39 for now (was not fully cold when I took my readings) had been driven around 12 miles so will check again when actually cold.

My previous experience with my Honda odyssey. I did like keeping + a few PSI especially in winter like 36-38 so that i would not drop below 35 if I did not check for a while. Anything higher then 38 made the van twitchy.

I did not notice any issues with Palisade will definitely shoot to keep around 36.

Silly question any difference in recommendations with Nitrogen filled tires?
 

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To nearly eliminate pressure fluctuation caused by rising and falling ambient temps, you could replace air with nitrogen
Nitrogen doesn't eliminate pressure fluctuations causes by temperature changes. It does, however, make them more predictable due to water vapor in the air; nitrogen is "dry" so it isn't effected by the humidity of where the tire was filled, etc.
 
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