Hyundai Palisade Forum banner

21 - 34 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
I can see this resulting in a recall situation. Recalls run through NHTSA and I’m sure with lawyers and the government involved, it’s not an overnight process.

I bought a 2011 Sonata which was a full redesign. That car had plenty of recalls, but I never regretted purchasing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
945 Posts
I can see this resulting in a recall situation. Recalls run through NHTSA and I’m sure with lawyers and the government involved, it’s not an overnight process.

I bought a 2011 Sonata which was a full redesign. That car had plenty of recalls, but I never regretted purchasing.
A recall can be initiated by the manufacturer too, not just because NHTSA does an investigation.

I have a 2012 Sonata - basically same as your 2011. Had plenty of issues, and it's on its second motor courtesy of Hyundai, but I also don't regret buying the car and I'm still daily-driving it. 173k miles and counting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
Oh I know manufacturers can initiate their own recalls, but they still end up running through NHTSA and that will always delay things, that was my point.

we only have 85k miles on our Sonata. The interior bits haven’t held up as nicely as I expected. For example, the center console and steering wheel bits that are covered in a sort of plastidip surface have not held up. Loved the look and feel when new, but the steering wheel peeled and the center console scratched easily and feels a bit gummy now. But still liking the car! Hahaha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I hear you and completely understand your concerns. Consider this. With the myriad of complex electrical systems seen in modern cars, there's thousands of ways those systems can misbehave or fail. You found ONE of them. Perhaps it was just a manufacturing error or a connector design problem. Maybe your foot bumped into a wire and caused it to pull free from a connector - who knows. The point is, consider the sum of the risks you're taking when driving your car at all, because when you do, the problem you've discovered somewhat pales in comparison. That's not say it's not a big deal - it most definitely is, but when it comes to destroying your confidence in the car as a whole, please don't let it do that to you. If this had been a fault with cruise control that suddenly drove you into oncoming traffic at highways speed, I would certainly be on edge about that anytime going forward... How about that Tesla that went full speed, head on into the truck that was crashed on the highway? It's crap like that that terrifies me. How did 9 separate sensors fail to see a giant metal truck blocking the lane ahead and still fail to react? "Autopilot" indeed...

That said, there's so many ways these systems can fail, and it does get a little nerve-racking to learn what 1 ground wire is capable of doing to your experience and confidence. Go slow, re-build that confidence, and hopefully you can soon enjoy your new car again without wondering when or if it's going to drive you head-on into oncoming traffic...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
Hi Sonartech, I appreciate your reply. Yes, if this was a minor issue and one in a million I'd probably breathe easier, but you might not have seen my previous posts. This is an issue that has occurred in enough Palisades that Hyundai told the dealership it was a known issue and they were able to immediately instruct them in a fix, so it's not just an oops with my car. They knew about this, and it's a problem that would easily cause injurious and/or fatal accidents. Perhaps it has already. This was not a bump to a wire by my foot, this is a problem with a ground wire that they fixed with Loctite. They had to pull the dashboard apart in order to access this wire. This failure caused my steering wheel to completely lock up four times, two while I was parked and trying to reverse, and two while actively driving. If this had happened on the freeway two minutes prior, I would perhaps not be here today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Ah, I understand - I got the impression that the collision warning system was misfiring, and that was doing something to the steering wheel as a result. "completely lock up" could be read many different ways... My guess is that what happened to you (and several others, apparently) will likely result in a recall and it just hasn't happened yet. It would be very helpful if you could post a summary of what your service paper work looks when you get it, so others can ask their dealers about it and get some broader awareness on this issue. If your interpretation for what "completely locks up" matches my interpretation, then this is definitely something I want to ask my dealer about.

Loctite? Are you kidding?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
Yes, sorry I guess it could be interpreted different ways, but by completely locking up I meant that my steering wheel suddenly would not budge right or left at all while driving, it was completely stuck and I was unable to pull over to the side. Immediately prior to that happening I got warnings on my display to check the blind spot system and another safely system. The only thing that cleared the error was to turn the engine off and on again, then my steering wheel was fine (until it happened yet again).

And yes, apparently Loctite, per the Hyundai service department, is the only thing keeping me from heading into oncoming traffic or going off the mountainside.

I will post the service paper. I don't think they wrote Loctite on there, but they told me multiple times that they cleaned the wire and put Loctite on. I have nothing against my local dealership. I don't think they had known of this issue before. But clearly corporate did and it's only a matter of time before there are deaths and injuries. I feel very, very lucky.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
Actually, Loctite is used in other parts of cars to keep bolts from loosening. Depending on the color/type/grade of Loctite, it can make for a virtually permanent bond.

I too see this heading to a recall because Hyundai will want to protect themselves from liability. No evidence has come out showing Hyundai is driven by greed in the way Ford or GM has, for instance.

I’ve searched as best I can for other incidents like this one and can’t find any. For such a safety related defect im surprised others haven’t posted if it is a larger problem.

I’m sure that moment of terror when you realized you couldn’t steer anymore has shaken your confidence in the car. Im sure you’ve considered selling it at this point too.
 

·
Registered
2020 Palisade SEL Lagoon Silver
Joined
·
165 Posts
Loctite is a brand name and while usually synonymous with thread locking compounds, they also make a di-electric grease for electrical connections
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
Yes, like Q-tips for cotton swabs and Kleenex for tissue and Band-Aids for bandages. :)

OP made it sound like they used a thread locker to secure something (ground) that came loose. A small bolt or screw holding a ground wire could benefit from threadlocker more than a dielectric grease. ;-)

plus the dealer told her they used Loctite
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Just an update, my car is still in the shop, but they have told me that it is a ground wire that came loose and they had to take the dashboard apart to fix it. He says it is fixed but they are driving it around to make sure it's not going to lock up again.
Ugh. Hearing that they had to take the dashboard apart on a brand new car is not at all ideal... with the complex wiring and technology in the dashboard, who knows what other issues could be created by rushed work and/or a sloppy techs. I've seen techs rip cars apart with little care and toss them back together in minutes. I get it, they are always trying to meet or beat book time to make the money, but the amount of deep issues I'm hearing about where these models are undergoing deep repairs is unnerving. I understand though, it's the first year of the model, bugs are being worked out...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
“Taking the dash apart” could also be the trim panels or the trim panels around the steering column, who knows?

yeah. I am never confident a car
Is put back together as tightly as what we get out of the factory, and that’s for all car makes not just Hyundai.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
“Taking the dash apart” could also be the trim panels or the trim panels around the steering column, who knows?
Yup, it sure could be that simple or it could have required pulling many components from the dash.

I replaced the heater core in my 2005 GMC Envoy that I previously owned about 10 years ago. It was an 11 hour book time job that I spent 16 hours doing because I documented with photos all wire locations/routing, component positioning, steps, nuances, etc. When I spoke to a tech at my local dealership, he said he had done them in 8 hours and admitted that no torque specs are followed, short cuts are made, and just enough care is placed around visible work to get the job done.

In general, successfully finishing the job to make sure there are no comebacks and the customer is happy and won't notice things they can't see is pretty much the way cars are worked on these days...
 
21 - 34 of 34 Posts
Top