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I got engine oil replaced with Pennzoil Platinum and the Fumoto F106 valve installed today. Will need the long adapter to fit. The valve barely touches the splash guard cover and no modification needed.
Doesn't the splash guard still have to be removed to replace the oil filter? Even still it is a lot better for directing the draining oil and you can attach a hose to the adapter to go into oil jugs using the shutoff valve when one is full.
 

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The splash guard still have to be removed to replace the oil filter. I found it to be annoying. They could have done a better design for oil filter and oil drain service without have to remove any cover.
 

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I thought about just leaving it off like I have done with other vehicles
I think it may have been a Telluride where the owner had an oil change done at a dealer and the tech cut out a section of the cover without notifying him or getting permission. When he saw that he was apesh#t and complained to the service manager who ordered a new cover. Not a huge job to remove it..
 

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Question about doing oil servicing yourself, I was in the impression that Hyundai wants proof of regular interval oil changes to warrant the drivetrain if something happens. Figured DIY doesnt count since I was told they want approved shops to do the servicing.
 

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Question about doing oil servicing yourself, I was in the impression that Hyundai wants proof of regular interval oil changes to warrant the drivetrain if something happens. Figured DIY doesnt count since I was told they want approved shops to do the servicing.
The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, passed by Congress in 1975, is the federal law that governs consumer product warranties.

The following is condensed from this FTC (Federal Trade Commission) website that discusses the provisions of the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act:

"It's illegal for a dealer to deny your warranty coverage simply because you had routine maintenance or repairs performed by someone else. Routine maintenance often includes oil changes, tire rotations, belt replacement, fluid checks and flushes, new brake pads, and inspections. Maintenance schedules vary by vehicle make, model and year; the best source of information about routine scheduled maintenance is your owner's manual.

An independent mechanic, a retail chain shop, or even you yourself can do routine maintenance and repairs on your vehicle. In fact, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, which is enforced by the FTC, makes it illegal for manufacturers or dealers to claim that your warranty is void or to deny coverage under your warranty simply because someone other than the dealer did the work. The manufacturer or dealer can, however, require consumers to use select repair facilities if the repair services are provided to consumers free of charge under the warranty.

That said, there may be certain situations where a repair may not be covered. For example, if you or your mechanic replaced a belt improperly and your engine is damaged as a result, your manufacturer or dealer may deny responsibility for fixing the engine under the warranty. However, according to the FTC, the manufacturer or dealer must be able to demonstrate that it was the improper belt replacement — rather than some other defect — that caused the damage to your engine. The warranty would still be in effect for other parts of your car.

The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act makes it illegal for companies to void your warranty or deny coverage under the warranty simply because you used an aftermarket or recycled part. The manufacturer or dealer can, however, require consumers to use select parts if those parts are provided to consumers free of charge under the warranty.

Still, if it turns out that the aftermarket or recycled part was itself defective or wasn't installed correctly, and it causes damage to another part that is covered under the warranty, the manufacturer or dealer has the right to deny coverage for that part and charge you for any repairs. The FTC says the manufacturer or dealer must show that the aftermarket or recycled part caused the need for repairs before denying warranty

Keep all service records and receipts, regardless of who performs the service. This includes oil changes, tire rotations, belt replacement, new brake pads, and inspections. Create a file to keep track of repairs; it will come in handy if you have to use your warranty. If you ever have a warranty claim and it appears that you did not maintain your vehicle, your claim could be denied."​
 
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