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I am getting my Palisade in another state and it is about 700 miles away. Is it okay to drive it 700 freeway miles straight from the dealership to home? I remember in the old days, it was recommended to break the car in but I believe that has all changed. To be honest, I have never driven my other new cars that far straight from the dealer on the first day. Is there anything I should do differently on the way home?
 

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I bought mine about 500 miles and drove it home with a couple of stops in between. I varied the speed at times, but I used my cruise control too and didn’t worry too much about the old school break in methods.
 

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2021 Hyundai Palisade Limited
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As long as you vary your speed as pointed out by raggedy1, you should be fine. I believe manual says first 600 miles keep tach below 4.

Congratulations, you can see what it does fuel wise and get use to Cruise control. 😀
 

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One of the most important aspects to the initial 600 miles of modern engine break in is not not keep at constant speeds. I think this will be very challenging on a freeway and definitely would not do it personally. Likely there will be no issue if you proceed.....but you really don’t know. I recall one post on this forum where the individual actually towed his old car a pretty considerable distance, a Prius as I recall. Could not believe what some people will do to save money on a $50k purchase.
How much would it cost to transport?
 

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Not wanting to argue but where did this whole “break-in” period originate from?

If you kept the car at an average of 2000 RPMs for an hour, that is 120,000 times the piston has gone up an down. The rings have done what the rings are going to do.

The engine has synthetic oil from the factory. Go rub a ring on on what ever material the cylinder walls are made of, cast iron I assume, 120,000 times in 4 inch up and down strokes slathered with oil and I guarantee that metal will score and polish.

Metal on metal will be done doing what it is going to do in a matter of minutes at 2000 rpms.

If break-in periods did damage if done improperly, you can guarantee that in an age of trying to get part failure to six sigma levels, they’d be hooking engines up to a factory shafts to break it in, or they would pre bore or polish cylinder walls. Or run all rings through a sand wash.

Break-in period is rubbish in my opinion. First hour that engine has done what it is going to do. Do they run an airplane up an down the runway for 500 miles before they fly? No. Do they run a rocket engine for 5 hours before lift off? No. Do they run an excavator for 10 hours before digging? Do they tell you to pull the plug on an air compressor every 2 minutes before filling the big tank? Do they tell you to let the chain saw idle for 10 hours before you cut your first tree?

Break in periods are non-sense.

A break in period to test that the car was put together properly, and they didn’t forget to put in some fluids or forgot a lug nut or 2 might be wise. But if it runs properly for an hour and no temperature warnings or wobbles one is good to go.
 

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I had an acquaintance once tell me "Drive it like you stole it."

I've always followed the break in period with all my vehicles but one. I figured that few hundred miles of driving as stated would protect my investment.

Typically I took most of my vehicles ( BMW, two Acura's, Honda Accord, and a Ford Taurus SHO to 150 thousand miles with no engine issues)

Which one did I deviate from that practice? Ford Taurus SHO. I was working in NYC for a Restaurant company and had the salesman drop the car off at the restaurant. Fed the meter until my shift was up.

I drove it from NYC to Connecticut and back to New Jersey that night and emptied the tank. I was on fumes around midnight searching for a gas station in the middle of nowhere. 🤣 It was not the smartest thing to do, but I hadn't had a car for a number of years and was eager to test that V8 out.😀

You can always take the scenic route on your trip.
 

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With that sentence, there really is no point in any further discussion on this matter with you. Take care and have a nice Easter weekend.
Well how do you break-in a 2 stroke or 4 stroke chain saw? The John Deere tractor from Lowes? How do you break in an industrial air-compressor? Honey, the Generac is in the break-in period…only 5 LED light bulbs for the first 5 hours. The ole weed eater…don’t hit the 8 inch weeds until you have cut 4 hours of 4 inch weeds…the list goes on. And two strokes don’t even use oil…they are fine with a 50:1 ratio.

These examples all have cylinders. And industrial or large compressors have quite complex heads and cylinders and there is no break-in period for them.

“My Furher, I know the Soviets just destroyed 1,000 Panzers. I can have 1,000 replacements out to Stalingrad, if you promise me that Rommel will have the guys take it easy on them for the first 200 Kilometers”

I would prefer it be called a “road trial” instead of a break-in period.

You don’t want to be the guy that jumps in the Lamborghini for the first time, guns it and the next thing you know your ass end is where the head lights were.

So with a new car, go on a “road trial” and don’t take it to its limits until you are comfortable with acceleration, braking, shifting and know where all the switches and knobs are. That makes more sense than a break-in period for an engine.

Are all these engineers and mechanics taking engines apart after the first 100 miles and feeling the cylinder walls and saying….oh this one was broken in perfect…and this one the guy obviously was gunning it prematurely.
Or are they observing it under the old electron microscope and looking for pitting?

Then you watch a guy pull a 1950’s Pontiac out of the junk yard, take off the head of a locked engine, throw some WD40 in the cylinders or any other lube he can find, start beating the hell out of the fly wheel until the engine works free. Replace some broken rings, put cylinder polisher on the end of a cordless drill and run it for a minute in the engine, put the engine back together and it runs like it was new.

It is an old boiler plate paragraph that was probably put in the first model T manuals and has never been taken out since and nobody has the guts to question it and redo a new digital PDF for the manual.
 

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Honey, the Generac is in the break-in period…only 5 LED light bulbs for the first 5 hours.
The generator I bought did have a break in period.

Airplane motors do have break in periods.


I get that you don't feel like they should, but any of the things you're listing here do have break in periods specified from the factory. Generally it's for peak efficiency. It's not like it won't work if you don't do the break in, but you may effect the longevity or efficiency of the motor.

You can throw wd40 on a 50s pontiac motor and it'll run like new, but "like new" is loose and leaky. There's a reason engine efficiency has increased in the last 70 years.


To answer the OPs question, just read the manual. It'll tell you what break in is needed. No one here knows better about what this motor needs than the people who designed it.
 

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The generator I bought did have a break in period.

Airplane motors do have break in periods.


I get that you don't feel like they should, but any of the things you're listing here do have break in periods specified from the factory. Generally it's for peak efficiency. It's not like it won't work if you don't do the break in, but you may effect the longevity or efficiency of the motor.

You can throw wd40 on a 50s pontiac motor and it'll run like new, but "like new" is loose and leaky. There's a reason engine efficiency has increased in the last 70 years.


To answer the OPs question, just read the manual. It'll tell you what break in is needed. No one here knows better about what this motor needs than the people who designed it.
That is why I prefer the term sea trials, air trials, road trials. Run the vehicle through the trials before testing peak performance for accelerating and deceleration and you will prevent many worse issues thscrewing up the diamond pattern of cylinder walls.

Don’t gun the weed eater until you understand the cutting ability and safety zones of guards unless you like scarred and pitted shins.

Don’t connect your generator up to the hot water tank right out of the box…you have a better chance of melting wires and blowing fuses than screwing up the diamond pattern of the cylinder walls.

After moving from a sedan to an SUV learn the vehicle’s handling and safety features during road trials before getting yourself into a situation where you have use peak performance on the vehicle.

I would also argue that brake pad seating is more important than cylinder diamond patterns.

I guess I am talking out of both sides of my mouth, but I truly believe if it was a big deal, manufacturers would pre-pickle the vehicles before handing the machinery over to novice mechanics.

And go read some of the break-in procedures for airplane engines…it makes my head hurt. Almost the opposite of car engines on the one example I read.
 

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I guess I am talking out of both sides of my mouth, but I truly believe if it was a big deal, manufacturers would pre-pickle the vehicles before handing the machinery over to novice mechanics.

And go read some of the break-in procedures for airplane engines…it makes my head hurt. Almost the opposite of car engines on the one example I read.
The problem with doing a pre-pickle is that it takes time and resources to have a fleet of products sitting there burning away and no one wants to buy a new car with 700 miles already on it. Much easier to tell the customer to do it and not take on the cost.


Airplane engines also operate in different operating conditions that most car vehicles. They generally spend all of their time at one peak efficiency rpm and don't get much in the way of varying loads/accelerations/etc like a car. Different requirements mean different designs mean different break in needs.
 

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This thread is what I enjoy most about this site.....soooo much knowledge. 👍
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Lots of different thoughts here, thank you, everyone. The savings is pretty substantial, hence the long trip. Most dealerships around me are $5,000 over MSRP and some are $2,000 over but don't have the color I want. Hence the dealership that is 700 miles away and is $2,000 under MSRP and has the color I want, is worth the trip.

I saw this information below on another site regarding a Santa Fe (I am guessing the information would be the same for a palisade)

Thank you for taking time to write to us. For the first 1000-1500km, we do recommend to follow the break-in period. During that period, we suggest not to brake hard, speed ( not over 110km ish) and not to start car abruptly. Thank you.

Regards,

Hyundai Auto Canada Corp.


They went on to say the following is from the manual.

During the First 1,200 Miles (2,000 Km)

No formal "break-in" procedure is required with your new Hyundai. However, you can contribute to the economical operation and durability of your Hyundai by observing the following recommendations during the first 1,200 miles (2,000 km).
  • Don't drive faster than 55 MPH (88 km/h).
  • While driving, keep your engine speed (rpm, or revolutions per minute) between 2,000 rpm and 4,000 rpm.
  • Use moderate acceleration. Don't start quickly or depress the accelerator pedal fully.
  • For the first 200 miles (300 km), try to avoid hard stops.
  • Don't lug the engine (in other words, don't drive so slowly in too high a gear that the engine "bucks"-shift to a lower gear).
  • Whether going fast or slow, vary your speed from time to time.
  • Don't let the engine idle longer than 3 minutes at one time.
  • Don't tow a trailer during the first 1,200 miles (2,000 km) of operation.
 

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If it were me, I'd get the vehicle from far away and accept that I'd be exceeding the 55 mph max they're advising, but do everything I can to keep varying the rpm, including manual selecting gears while cruising, etc. and otherwise follow the break in. It isn't ideal, but for a $7000 savings, I'd risk the small reduction in overall efficiency. Ultimately, it's your call.
 

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I also agree, that is a very significant savings. As has been suggested I’d take the scenic route and enjoy the sites in your new vehicle and stay away from any freeway use. My reason for not taking the freeway is that if it was me, even though my intentions would be good, I would end up staying on it for as long as possible and doing 80 mph like everyone else is. Definitely would follow Hyundais break in recommendations.
 

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Here is what our USA owners manual says about the vehicle break-in period.
By following a few simple precautions for the first 600 miles (1,000 km) you may add to the performance, economy and life of your vehicle. • Do not race the engine. • While driving, keep your engine speed (rpm, or revolutions per minute) between 2,000 rpm and 4,000 rpm. • Do not maintain a single speed for long periods of time, either fast or slow.Varying engine speed is needed to properly break-in the engine. • Avoid hard stops, except in emergencies, to allow the brakes to seat properly
copied and pasted right from the owners manual
 

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I bought a new Tacoma in November of 2000 and drove it straight to the mud pit. 560 miles it was covered in mud, redlined dozens of times... I sold it with 401,000 miles on it a year ago (minus 2nd gear) to a guy that texts me frequently and he is still driving it, still without 2nd gear lol. It is still on the original engine and auto trans. running like a top, and the rear main seal only leaked about a quart over the 5000 mile oil change interval. I owned a produce market for 20 years, and 10 of those years I hauled 2-6 pallets of produce daily with it on a 16' trailer for about 40 miles one way. Now this Palisade - I bought mine in Miami and live near Tampa (just over 300 miles away) and I towed my prius back with the Palisade at 75-80mph with a tow dolly. It seems to be running fine so far, I will let you know in a few years if I have any issues 😁
 

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I bought a new Tacoma in November of 2000 and drove it straight to the mud pit. 560 miles it was covered in mud, redlined dozens of times... I sold it with 401,000 miles on it a year ago (minus 2nd gear) to a guy that texts me frequently and he is still driving it, still without 2nd gear lol. It is still on the original engine and auto trans. running like a top, and the rear main seal only leaked about a quart over the 5000 mile oil change interval. I owned a produce market for 20 years, and 10 of those years I hauled 2-6 pallets of produce daily with it on a 16' trailer for about 40 miles one way. Now this Palisade - I bought mine in Miami and live near Tampa (just over 300 miles away) and I towed my prius back with the Palisade at 75-80mph with a tow dolly. It seems to be running fine so far, I will let you know in a few years if I have any issues 😁
Did you call Guinness? That is the fastest a Prius has ever gone. You set a world record!:D
 

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Did you call Guinness? That is the fastest a Prius has ever gone. You set a world record!:D
Lol, the prius is electronically governed at 116mph. It would easily go faster if that governor weren't there 😁. Those things aren't as slow as everyone thinks. I had the prius for 6 years and put 153k on it with 0 issues too.
 
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